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SV International
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container DRY CARGO CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Container Weight Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.70 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.244 57.10 2.276 2.205

Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger internal cube

container REFRIGERATED CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Container Weight Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.70 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.244 57.10 2.276 2.205

Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger internal cube

container OPEN TOP CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Container Weight Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.70 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.244 57.10 2.276 2.205

Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger internal cube

container FLAT RACK CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Container Weight Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.70 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.244 57.10 2.276 2.205

Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger internal cube

container GARMENT CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Container Weight Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
20 ft 24,000 3,050 20,950 5.449 2.290 2.244 26.70 2.276 2.261
40 ft 30,480 4,520 25,960 11.690 2.250 2.244 57.10 2.276 2.205

Manufactured from either Aluminium or steel, they are suitable for most types of cargo / general cargo. Aluminium containers have a slightly larger payload than steel, and steel containers have a slightly larger internal cube

HIGH CUBE CONTAINERS
  Container Weight Interior Measurement Door Open
Type Gross (kg) Tare(kg) Net (kg) Length (m) Width (m) Height (m) Capacity (m3) Width (m) Height(m)
40 ft 30,480 3,980 26,500 12,031 2.352 2.698 76.30 2.340 2.585
45 ft 30,480 4,800 25,680 13.544 2.352 2.698 86.00 2.340 2.585
Type IATA ID
Code (New)
Tare
Weight (kg)
Base Size Limitation Weight
Length (cm) Width (cm) Thick (cm) Max Gross (kg) Square (kg/m2)
20 Ft PGE 500 - 535 605 243 5.4 11.340 3.905
16 Ft PRA 380 - 470 498 243 5.4 11.340 3.905
96 Inc PMP / PMC 115 - 125 317 243 - 6.803 1.925
88 Inc PAP / PAG 110-115 317 223 - 6,803 1.925
PLB PLB 85-90 317 153 2.5 3,175 976 - 3,051
IATA ID CODE AKE
BASE SIZE  
Length 156 cm
Width 153 cm
Tare Weight 90 - 105 kg
WEIGHT LIMITATION  
Max Gross Weight 1,587 kg
Limitation Res Square 976 kg/m2
Limitation Res Square 4.3 m3
IATA ID CODE AKE
BASE SIZE  
Length 317 cm
width 223 cm
Height 162 cm
Tare Weight 260 kg
WEIGHT LIMITATION  
Max Gross Weight 6,033 kg
Limitation Res Square 1,952 kg/m2
Internal Volume 9,91 m3
IATA ID CODE AK
BASE SIZE  
Length 317cm
Width 223 cm
Height 162 cm
Tare Weight 225-310 kg
WEIGHT LIMITATION  
Max Gross Weight 3,033 kg
Limitation Res Square 1,464 kg/m2
Internal Volume 10.4 m3
GOH Max 1,800 - 3,000 kg
IATA ID CODE AKE
BASE SIZE  
Length 156cm
Width 153cm
Hight 162cm
Tare Weight 185 - 380 kg
WEIGHT LIMITATION  
Max Gross Weight 1,587 kg
Limitation Res Square 976 kg/m2
Internal Volume 3.2 - 3.5 m3
Dry Ice Max 40 - 60

Length
Breadth
Height
Select
No of Boxes
  KG
 

As of January 1, 2011 the eighth edition, Incoterms 2010, have taken effect. The changes therein affect all of the five terms previously listed in section D, which are now obsolete and have been replaced with these three:

  • DAT (Delivered at Terminal)
  • DAP (Delivered at Place)
  • DDP (Delivered Duty Paid)
  • The new terms apply to all modes of transport.

    Group C – Main carriage paid

    Seller must bear the cost and freight to bring the goods to the destined port. The risk is transferred to the buyer once the goods have crossed the ship's rail. Maritime transport only and Insurance for the goods is NOT included. Insurance is at the Cost of the Buyer.

    Exactly the same as CFR, except that the seller must procure and pay for insurance for the buyer. Maritime transport only.

    The general/containerized/multimodal equivalent of CFR. The seller pays for carriage to the named place of destination. The risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

    The containerized transport/multimodal equivalent of CIF. Seller pays for carriage and insurance to the named destination point, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

    New arrival incoterms have been discussed in the Incoterms 2010 brought out by the ICC and DAT and DAP have replaced DAF,DES,DEQ and DDU. Given here is a small explanation provided by the ICC. Two new Incoterms rules – DAT and DAP – have replaced the Incoterms 2000 rules DAF, DES, DEQ and DDU

    The number of Incoterms® rules have been reduced from 13 to 11. This has been achieved by substituting two new rules that may be used irrespective of the agreed mode of transport – DAT, Delivered at Terminal, and DAP, Delivered at Place – for the Incoterms® 2000 rules DAF, DES, DEQ and DDU.

    Under both new rules, delivery is made at the named destination: in DAT, at the buyer’s disposal unloaded from the arriving vehicle (as under the former DEQ rule); in DAP, likewise at the buyer’s disposal, but ready for unloading (as under the former DAF, DES and DDU rules). The new rules make the Incoterms® 2000 rules DES and DEQ superfluous. The named terminal in DAT may well be in a port, and DAT can therefore safely be used in cases where the Incoterms® 2000 rule DEQ once was. Likewise, the arriving “vehicle” under DAP may well be a ship and the named place of destination may well be a port: consequently, DAP can safely be used in cases where the Incoterms® 2000 rule DES once was. These new rules, like their predecessors, the goods are “delivered”, with the seller bearing all the cost (other than those related to import clearance, where applicable) and risks involved in bringing the goods to the named place of destination.

    This term may be used for all transport modes. The seller delivers the goods when they are placed at the disposal of the buyer on the arriving means of transport ready for unloading at the named place of destination. As the risk is transferred from the seller to the buyer, at the agreed place of destination, the buyers are advised to specify clearly ,the point within the agreed place of destination. If the seller is responsible for clearing the goods, paying duties etc consideration should be given to using the DDP term.

    As per this term the seller delivers the goods when they are placed at the disposal of the buyer on the arriving means of transport, ready for unloading at the named place of destination. This is exactly what the old Incoterm DDU stipulated.

    According to this term the seller pays all the transportation cost and bears all risk until the goods have been delivered and pays the duty. Also used interchangeably with the term "Free Domicile". The most comprehensive term for the buyer. In most of the importing countries, taxes such as (but not limited to) VAT and excises should not be considered prepaid being handled as a "refundable" tax. Therefore VAT and excises usually are not representing a direct cost for the importer since they will be recovered against the sales on the local (domestic) market.

    OLD INCOTERMS

    This term is used when the goods are transported by rail and road. The seller pays for transportation to the named place of delivery at the frontier. The buyer arranges for customs clearance and pays for transportation from the frontier to his factory. The passing of risk occurs at the frontier.

    Where goods are delivered ex ship, the passing of risk does not occur until the ship has arrived at the named port of destination and the goods made available for unloading to the buyer. The seller pays the same freight and insurance costs as he would under a CIF arrangement. Unlike CFR and CIF terms, the seller has agreed to bear not just cost, but also Risk and Title up to the arrival of the vessel at the named port. Cost for unloading the goods and any duties, taxes, etc… are for the Buyer. A commonly used term in shipping bulk commodities, such as coal, grain, dry chemicals - - - and where the seller either owns or has chartered, their own vessel.

    This is similar to DES, but the risk is not transferred, until the goods have been unloaded at the port of destination.

    This term means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer to the named place of destination as per the contract of sale. The goods are not cleared for import or unloaded from any form of transport at the place of destination. The buyer is bound to bear the costs and risks for unloading, duty and any subsequent delivery beyond the place of destination. However, if the buyer wishes the seller to bear cost and risks associated with the import clearance, duty, unloading and subsequent delivery beyond the place of destination, then this all needs to be explicitly agreed upon in the contract of sale.

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incoterm

    “S V International’’ makes every effort to ensure that the information that appear on its website is true and up-to- date. However, errors or omissions may occur, and for this reason, the User should not consider information to be accurate without first checking the accuracy of the information with S V International’’. None of the information or content on this website should be considered as an indubitable fact. S V International’’ cannot control how the User utilizes the information or content offered on this website and will therefore not be held responsible for deeds, acts or damages, whether direct or indirect, suffered by the User or third- parties which could be the consequence or arise from the use of said information or content.”

 
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